Over the Waves: Santa Maria Manuela

I am fortunate to know some very creative and amazing people, and sometimes I'm fortunate enough to be asked to participate in their projects! Today at 2:30pm, I'll be joining Lacy O'Connell and Andrew Winter of Winconnell Films at The Rooms to talk about their new short documentary, "Sailor on the Hill".

Read More

Over the Waves: Margaret Olwill

Built and owned by James P. Smith (J.P & L.A. Smith) of Chicago, the Margaret Olwill was a steam freighter during an era when almost all goods and services were delivered by ship to the communities along the water’s edge. A reliable vessel, her wood and steel hull kept her sturdy against the weather of the Great Lakes. 

Read More

In The Harbour: NRP Viana do Castelo

UPDATED: August 19th, 2017

Wondering what that navy vessel is in the harbour this weekend? Take a peek at this article I wrote in 2014 that tells you all about it. As of this edit, there are four other vessels of this same class under construction in Portugal - Sines, Setúbal, Funchal, and Aveiro - at the WestSea Shipyard. Sines was launched on May 3rd, 2017 and is set to join the navy June of next year (2018). Setúbal is on schedule to be launched in 2019. Funchal and Aveiro are scheduled to begin construction later this year. The Viana do Castelo-class ships will gradually replace the current Baptista de Andrade-class corvettes in the Portuguese fleet.

Read More

Over The Waves: SS Princess May

The Canadian Pacific Railway had been expanding its range since it’s creation in 1881, increasing their portfolio to include both railways and steamships ,and creating a way from someone to travel from Liverpool, UK to Japan, China, or Hong Kong without ever needing to change carriers. In 1901, they purchased the Canadian Pacific Navigation Company and added West Coast coastal ships to their list of services. This new division, the Canadian Pacific Railway Coast Service, sailed a fleet of “Princess” ships from Vancouver, BC to Skagway, Alaska. One of these ships is the one whose story we’re looking at this week – the SS Princess May.

Read More

Over the Waves: M/S World Discoverer

Happy Tuesday, everyone. This week, we're travelling back outside Canadian waters, but still sticking with the theme of close-to-shore wrecks. When I was looking for a topic this week, this one struck me not because the ship had a particularly enticing career, or because she was a mega-ship, but because she was so recent. With such interest in the wreck of the Costa Concordia just a couple of years ago, I was genuinely surprised that as recently as 2000 this particular ship had just been left to rust away in a secluded cove of the Solomon Islands. This week, we look at the wreck of the M/S World Discoverer.

Read More

Over the Waves: USS Truxtun

At the beginning of the Second World War, it was decided by the Allied forces that perhaps Newfoundland was more strategic of a location than they had previously thought. Being closer to Europe that anywhere else in North America, and being an island, gave it an advantage that land-based ports didn't have. Unfortunately, the effects of the Depression and the FIrst World War were still being felt, and Newfoundland could not afford to build any new defences on its Island shores. The Americans built two bases - one in St. John's, on the site of Pleasantville (the old training grounds of the Newfoundland Regiment) and one in Argentia, along the south shore.   One night in 1942, however, this arrangement would prove costly for two ships of the American fleet: the USS Pollux and the USS Truxtun. This weeks entry is going to focus on the loss of the Truxton.

Read More

Over the Waves: Empress of Scotland

Happy Tuesday all! Sorry for the delay in posting. Continuing on with our theme from last week, I decided to go with another lesser known ocean liner from my favourite era. Back in the day, Canadian Pacific not only had a railway, but had ocean liners that left from both coasts. At one point, Canada had transportation that covered over half of the world, being able to get from Liverpool to Singapore without changing the shipping line. One of their ships was the elegant Empress of Scotland, coming into the fleet in 1921. Leading up to that however, she had a long career.

Read More